Department Of Natural Science Lecture Notes


Lecturer

1) INTRODUCTION TO GENETICS.

(Mrs Ozemoka Joy Habibat)

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the week, the students are expected to know:

 -what  genetics entails

 -the varoius areas of genetics

 -Terminologies associated with genetics.

 - Brief history of genetics.

 - The laws of Mendelian genetics.

Lecturer

2) AEB 121: INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY.

(Mrs Ozemoka Joy Habibat)

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOME

v At the end of the week, the students should be able to know:

v What Annelids are

v the characteristics of Annelids

v the various classes of Annelids

v the differences between the classes.

v the economic importance of Annelids.

 

Lecturer

3) AEB 121 PHYLUM MOLLUSCA.

(Mrs Ozemoka Joy Habibat)

INTENDED LEARNING OUT - COME

  • At the end of the class, the students are expected to know the following:
  • What molluscs are
  • The characteristics of Molluscs
  • The various classes of Molluscs
  • The distinguishing characteristics between the various classes
  • The economic importance of Molluscs
  • The difference between molluscs and other phyla.

Lecturer

4) AEB121: INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY PHYLUM ARTHROPODA.

(Mrs Ozemoka Joy Habibat)

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOME

  • At the end of the class, the students should be able to know the following:
  • The meaning of Arthropods.
  • The characteristics of Arthropods.
  • The reasons for abundance and diversity of Arthropods.
  • The various classes of Arthropods.
  • The economic importance of Arthropods.

Lecturer

5) AEB 122: CLASS AVES.

(Mrs Ozemoka Joy Habibat)

INTRODUCTION

?Birds or Aves are the most noticeable, melodious and most beautiful of the vertebrates.

?There are more than 10,400 species world wide.

?They are found in the forests, deserts, mountains, praires and all oceans.

Lecturer

6) AEB122 CLASS: REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM OF MAMMALS.

(Mrs Ozemoka Joy Habibat)

CONTENTS:

      MONETREMES

      MARSUPIALS

      PLACENTAL MAMMALS.

Lecturer

7) INTRODUCTION TO ECOLOGY .

(Dr Agbugui Marian Onwude)

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the completion of this course, students are expected to:

  1. Define the ecosystem
  2. Know and enumerate the factors effecting the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem,
  3. Discuss the types of interaction and the benefits to man and his environment
  4. Discuss the types of erosion and the possible ways of conservation of the ecosystem

 

Lecturer

8) INTRODUCTION TO GENETICS AND CELL PHYSIOLOGY.

(Dr Agbugui Marian Onwude)

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the completion of this course, students are expected to:

  1. Give a brief history of RNA and DNA
  2. Describe the location of RNA and DNA
  3. Enumerate the uses and functionalities of RNA and DNA
  4. Differentiate between RNA and DNA
  5. Enumerate the uses and application of bioenergetics
  6. State the functions of biological membrane

Lecturer

9) INTRODUCTORY MOLECULAR BIOLOGY.

(Dr Ajayi Olulope Olufemi)

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES

 


1.  To define the chromosomes and genes
2.  To discuss the process of DNA replication and repair  
3.  To distinguish between biological information transfer in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

Lecturer

10) INTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY 2.

(Mr Ehiosun Kevin Iyere)

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


At the completion of this lecture, students are expected to:
1. Know the building block of proteins  
2. State the twenty (20) common amino acids  
3. Classify the twenty (20) common amino acids by properties of their side chains
4. Understand the formation of peptides

Lecturer

11) MICROBIAL ECOLOGY NOTE.

(Miss Ezeanya Chinyere Charity)

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


At the completion of this course, students are expected to:
1.  Define the concept of microbial ecology.
2.  Understand all the types of microbial interaction.
3.  Understand the concept of microbes and ecological theory.
4.  Apply  the  concept  of the  different  types  of  adaptation  of  microbes  to  their
environment and articulate solutions to simple problems.
5.   Carry out projects to:  
?  Identify possible microbial interaction in an environment.

Lecturer

12) GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY NOTE.

(Miss Ezeanya Chinyere Charity)

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the completion of this course, students are expected to:
1.  Define the concept of microbial cell structure.
2.  Demonstrate knowledge on the TWO main types of microbial cell structure.
3.  Define  and  list  the  different  phases  of  growth;  factors  affecting  microbial
growth.
4.  Apply the role of micro-organisms in soil, food and to solve simple practical
problems.
5.   Carry out projects to:  
?  Identify and differentiate between…

Lecturer

13) INTRODUCTION TO PLANT BIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY NOTE .

(Mr Imarhiagbe Odoligie )

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


At the completion of this course, students are expected to:
1.  Understand the reason for classification of living organism,
2.  Understand the characteristics and the evolutionary relationships among groups of plants.  
3.  Demonstrate hands-on practical on self-identification of plants using classification keys

Lecturer

14) FUNCTIONAL BIOCHEMISTRY.

(Dr Ugbenyen Moses Anthony)

At the completion of this course, students are expected to:

  1. Define various concept of Signal transduction (e.g hormones and neurotransmitters).
  2. List and classify plant and animal hormones.
  3. List the different classes of neurotransmitters.
  4. Draw the biochemical structure of the listed neurotransmitters.
  5. Understand how hormones and neurotransmitters transduce signal.
  6. Understand the concept of second messenger in signal transduction.
  7. Understand the role of cAMP, IP3, Ca2+ in sensing and processing stimuli.

Lecturer

15) INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (PART A LECTURE NOTE).

(Dr Agbugui Marian Onwude  and DR. OTARIGHO BENSON & MRS. H. J. OZEMOKA)

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the completion of this course section, students are expected to:

  • Define cell.
  • Explain the concept of cell.
  • State the components of cell and their functions
  • List and explain the levels of organization.
  • Relate the knowledge from the organization of life to real life issues.

State the advantages and the disadvantages of complexity in higher organisms.

Lecturer

16) BACTERIOLOGY.

(Miss Ozolua Phebean Onosen)

Taxonomy is the science of biological classification. The basic taxonomic group is the species, which is defined in terms of either sexual reproduction or general similarity. Morphological, physiological, genetic and molecular characteristic are all useful in taxonomy because they reflect the activity and organization of the genome. Bacterial taxonomy is rapidly changing due to the acquisition of new data, particularly the use of molecular techniques, such as the comparison of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) structure and chromosome sequences.…

Lecturer

17) GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY_ROLE OF MICROORGANISMS IN FOOD AND SOIL.

(Miss Ozolua Phebean Onosen)

Food often provides an ideal environment for microbial survival and growth. Microbial growth in food involves successional changes, with intrinsic (food related) and extrinsic (environmental) factors interacting with the microbial communities. Wines, beers and other alcoholic products are also produced through microbial activities. On the other hand, food can also serve as vehicles for disease transmission, and the detection and control of pathogens and food spoilage microorganisms are important parts of food microbiology. Microbial growth in foods can…

Lecturer

18) INTRODUCTION TO PLANT FORM AND FUNCTIONS.

(Dr Edokpolor Ohanmu   and Odoligie Imarhiagbe )

Introduction
Plant Anatomy and Physiology
This will be taught in the following areas:
1. The shoot system (Leaves, Stems, fruits and flowers)
2. Root system

Lecturer

19) BIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES_ LECTURE NOTES.

(Dr Edokpolor Ohanmu   and Mrs Goddidit Enoyoze; Odoligie Imarhiagbe)

Basic research is a scientific research aimed to improve scientific theories for improved understanding and prediction of natural or other phenomena. It can be referred to as pure or fundamental research and often driven by curiosity, basic research fuels applied science's innovations.

Lecturer

20) GENERAL ECOLOGY _ LECTURE NOTE.

(Mr Imarhiagbe Odoligie )

Ecology is the scientific study of interactions among organisms and their environment. It is an interdisciplinary field that straddles biology, geography, and Earth science. Objects of study include interactions of organisms with each other and with abiotic components of their environment. Topics of interest include the biodiversity, distribution, biomass, and populations of organisms, as well as cooperation and competition within and between species. Ecosystems are dynamically interacting systems of organisms, the communities they make up, and the non-living…

Lecturer

21) BRYOLOGY AND PTERIDOLOGY_LECTURE NOTE.

(Mr Imarhiagbe Odoligie   and Mrs Goddidit Enoyoze; OHANMU, Edokpolor O.)

Bryology is the branch of botany concerned with the scientific study of bryophytes (mosses, liverworts, and hornworts). Bryologists are people who have an active interest in observing, recording, classifying or researching bryophytes. The field is often studied along with lichenology due to the similar appearance and ecological niche of the two organisms, even though bryophytes and lichens are not classified in the same kingdom. Bryophytes were first studied in detail in the 18th century. The beginning of bryology…

Lecturer

22) HERBAL MEDICINE.

(Mrs Igbape Goddidit Esiro)

Medicinal plants are those plants that are commonly used in treating and preventing specific ailments and diseases that are generally considered to be harmful to humans. Since the dawn of human history, man has relied so much on medicinal plants for health and food needs. Medicinal plants have been used not just for curing and preventing illnesses, but also for the promotion of both physical and spiritual well-being among people in all cultures and almost every household.
When…

Lecturer

23) ECONOMIC BOTANY AND ETHNOBOTANY.

(Mrs Igbape Goddidit Esiro)

WHAT IS ETHNOBOTANY ?
Ethnobotany is the scientific study of the traditional knowledge and customs of a people concerning plants and their medical, religious, and other uses.
Ethnobotany is an important branch of Plant Science that deals with the study of the relationship between plants and people. It includes the traditional use of plants in different fields like medicine and agriculture. These plants are mostly used by the rural and tribal people for their livelihood. Unfortunately, this traditional…

Lecturer

24) INTRODUCTORY MICROBIOLOGY_LECTURE NOTE.

(Miss Ezeanya Chinyere Charity)

The very existence of this microbial world was unknown to man until the invention of microscope at the beginning of the 17th century. The discovery of the microbial world was by a Dutch man, Antonio Van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723). Microbiology is the study of the organism that is too small to be clearly perceived with the naked eye.

Lecturer

25) MICROBIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES_LECTURE NOTE.

(Miss Ezeanya Chinyere Charity)

Microscopy deals with the use of the microscope. Microscopes are instruments used to view microorganisms. They magnify these tiny organisms that are too small to be seen with the unaided eye. Microscopes differs by their resolving power. There are basically two main classes of microscope: The Light Microscope and The Electron Microscope.

Lecturer

26) INTRODUCTORY VIROLOGY_LECTURE NOTE.

(Miss Ezeanya Chinyere Charity)

Virology is the branch of microbiology that deals with the study of viruses. Viruses are the smallest obligate intracellular parasites ranging in size from 20nm to 300nm in diameter.

Lecturer

27) INTRODUCTION TO TROPICAL PARASITOLOGY_LECTURE NOTE.

(Mrs Ozemoka Joy Habibat)

Parasitology is the study of the biology of parasites and their host. Flora and fauna bodies are rich environments which have been colonized by parasites throughout evolutionary history. The field of parasitology has developed out of the curious efforts of scientists to understand parasites and their relationship with their hosts.
Parasitism is a physiological association between two living organisms. It could be between animals, plants or between an animal and a plant. It could be short or long…

Lecturer

28) IMMUNOLOGY_LECTURE NOTE.

(Mr Okafor Arthur Chinedu)

The discipline of immunology emerged from the observation that individuals who recovered from certain infectious diseases were thereafter protected from the disease. The immune system evolved to protect multicellular organisms from pathogens. The immune system is highly adaptable and defends the body against diverse invaders. The diversity of potential pathogens requires a range of recognition and destruction mechanisms to match the multitude of invaders. Immunity is a state of protection from infectious disease. The body is protected from…

Lecturer

29) GENERAL MYCOLOGY_LECTURE NOTE.

(Mr Okafor Arthur Chinedu)

All fungi have typical eukaryotic morphology. They have rigid cell wall composed of chitin which may be layered with mannans, glucans and other polysaccharides in association with polypeptides. Some lower fungi possess cellulose in their cell wall. The plasma membrane is a typical bilayered membrane in addition to the presence of sterols. Fungal membranes possess ergosterol in contrast to cholesterol found in mammalian cells. The cytoplasm consists of various organelles such as mitochondria, golgi apparatus, ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum,…

Lecturer

30) AN INTRODUCTION TO FAUNA BIODIVERSITY.

(Dr Agbugui Marian Onwude  and Mrs H.J. Ozemoka)

An introduction to Fauna biodiversity
A description and classification of the animal kingdom in taxa.
Biodiversity – this is the study of variety of organisms in an ecosystem
All organisms in a population living in a certain area plus their physical environment. This includes all form of animals (animal and animal-like). Two groups are obtainable :
? Invertebrates (Animals with back bone)
? Vertebrates (animals without back bone)

Lecturer

31) INTRODUCTORY GENETICS AND CELL PHYSIOLOGY.

(Dr Agbugui Marian Onwude  and Mrs H.J. Ozemoka)

Introduction:
Cell, in biology is the basic membrane-bound unit that contains the fundamental molecules of life and of which all living things are composed. A single cell is often a complete organism in itself, such as a bacterium or yeast. Other cells acquire specialized functions as they mature. These cells cooperate with other specialized cells and become the building blocks of large multicellular organisms, such as animals and humans.

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